JR @ TED Prize wish Launch

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JR


Dates

03.03.11 - 03.04.11

Location

170 N Promenade

Info

JR@TED   TED Prize launch is open to the public and Phantom Galleries LA is  inviting you to join us.

One Artist, One Wish, to change the world.

And you can partcipate.

In the spirit of JR's work and in an unusual move, this typically exclusive TED experience will embrace the general public and invite everyone in for a visit. You can help JR launch his wish by visiting the JR @ TED gallery


Hours

Noon to 7pm on Thursday, March 3, 2011                                                                                   
10am to 7pm Friday, March 4, 2011

Location JR @ TED    at Phantom Galleries LA  
170 N Promenade, Long Beach, CA 90802

 

About JR:
JR exhibits his photographs in the biggest art gallery on the planet. His work is presented freely in the streets of the world, catching the attention of people who are not museum visitors. His work mixes Art and Action; it talks about commitment, freedom, identity and limit.
JR creates "Pervasive Art" that spreads uninvited on the buildings of the slums around Paris, on the walls in the Middle-East, on the broken bridges in Africa or the favelas in Brazil. People who often live with the bare minimum discover something absolutely unnecessary. And they don't just see it, they make it. Some elderly women become models for a day; some kids turn artists for a week. In that Art scene, there is no stage to separate the actors from the spectators.
After these local exhibitions, the images are transported to London, New York, Berlin or Amsterdam where people interpret them in the light of their own personal experience.
As he remains anonymous and doesn't explain his huge full frame portraits of people making faces, JR leaves the space empty for an encounter between the subject/protagonist and the passer-by/interpreter.

About JR@TED Exhibit:
The exhibit is an extension of the TED Conference.   The space is open for TED attendees at select hours from Tuesday through Friday.  It is open to the general public from Thursday to Friday.

The gallery includes original works from JR and another installation that will be unveiled on Thursday as part of his TED Prize.

General information on JR:
http://www.tedprize.org/jr-one-artist-one-wish-to-change-the-world-will-you-join-him

New York Times Magazine article:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/27/magazine/27Photograffeur-t.html

LA Weekly coverage of his current “Wrinkles of the City” LA project:   
http://blogs.laweekly.com/stylecouncil/2011/02/jr_wrinkles_of_the_city.php

JR’s website:
www.jr-art.net

About the TED Prize-
The TED Prize is designed to leverage the TED community’s exceptional array of talent and resources. It is awarded annually to an exceptional individual who receives $100,000 and, much more important, “One Wish to Change the World.” After several months of preparation, s/he unveils his/her wish at an award ceremony held during the TED Conference. These wishes have led to collaborative initiatives with far-reaching impact.

We work closely with the TED community, off- and online, to obtain pledges of support for the TED Prize winners. These pledges can take the form of business services, hardware and software, publicity, infrastructure, advice, connections, feet on the ground and more. This is in addition to the funding and support from the Sapling Foundation and TED staff.

About TED
TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from those three worlds. Since then its scope has become ever broader.

The TED Conference, held annually in the spring, is the heart of TED. More than a thousand people now attend, the event sells out a year in advance, and the content has expanded to include science, business, the arts and the global issues facing our world. Over four days, 50 speakers each take an 18-minute slot, and there are many shorter pieces of content, including music, performance and comedy. There are no breakout groups. Everyone shares the same experience. It shouldn’t work, but it does. It works because all of knowledge is connected. Every so often it makes sense to emerge from the trenches we dig for a living, and ascend to a 30,000-foot view, where we see, to our astonishment, an intricately interconnected whole.